“Big Sky Boots” book highlights Montana farm and ranch life

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Posted: Dec 20, 2012 9:46 AM by Art Taft (Great Falls)
Updated: Dec 20, 2012 9:46 AM

In October, the Montana Stockgrowers Association released Big Sky Boots: Working Seasons of a Montana Cowboy, a coffee table photography book featuring the work of Lauren Chase, the organization’s multimedia outreach specialist.

Carl Mattson of the MSGA visited Art Taft on “Montana This Morning” to talk about the book and what went into creating it.

Chase spent the a year and a half gathering photographs for the book, traveling to ranches across Montana.

The book takes the reader on a journey through a year in the life of Montana’s cowboys – through calving, branding, and shipping, and everything in between.

Chase said, “Our goal with this project has been to create a unique, fun, engaging and interactive way to tell the story of Montana’s ranching families that raise the beef that consumers all across the world enjoy. There seems to be a growing disconnect as people, even here in Montana, are losing touch with what goes on at ranches and farms, and where our food comes from.”

Big Sky Boots is part of a larger project that uses social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube to tell the stories of Montana’s ranching families through photo albums, audio slide shows, and videos.

Chase says that one hallmark of the book is that the photos are largely untouched or enhanced by photo editing software.

Chase noted, “A lot of books that are out there right now depict a romanticized view of the West and of the cowboy lifestyle. We wanted to make sure to show life as it really is on Montana’s ranches. I think there is a tremendous amount of natural beauty in the pictures and it gives the reader a glimpse into the life of a real cowboy in Montana.”

Big Sky Boots is the first book in a series of five books that MSGA will develop over the next five years. The next book, already in production, will feature the women that are an essential part of today’s ranching families.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO FEATURE

I Am Angus: Lauren Chase, Montana Stockgrowers Association

Published on Dec 3, 2012 by the American Angus Association
In this “I Am Angus” segment, photographer and writer Lauren Chase shares her journey from the city to the ranches of Montana. For more information, visit http://www.angus.org or http://www.mtbeef.org

Lauren Chase profiles Montana ranchers

BY MADDY BUTCHER GRAY for NickerNews.net

Originally posted on Dec. 8, 2012.

Proud grandparents can be better at promotion than the best public relations experts.

That’s how I learned about Lauren Chase, multimedia outreach specialist for the Montana Stockgrowers Association. Her grandpa, Dave Dohnalek, farmed for decades on his Iowa land. Now retired, he and his wife stop into the Kava Houseregularly. That’s where I served them lunch and learned about Lauren.
The recent University of Iowa graduate has worked to bring the association into the social media world. She maintains many platforms (facebook, YouTube, etc.) and put together a large coffee table book, celebrating the ranch life.

Read the Q&A

 

Montana Stockgrowers Association book profiles cowboy life

Posted: Aug 24, 2012 2:36 PM by Evan Weborg (evan@kxlh.com)
Updated: Aug 24, 2012 2:43 PM

In early October, the Montana Stockgrowers Association will releaseBig Sky Boots: Working Seasons of a Montana Cowboy, a coffee table photography book featuring the work of Lauren Chase, the organization’s multimedia outreach specialist.

Chase has spent the past year and a half gathering photographs for the book, traveling to ranches across Montana.

The book takes the reader on a journey through a year in the life of Montana’s cowboys – through calving, branding, and shipping, and everything in between.

Chase said, “Our goal with this project has been to create a unique, fun, engaging and interactive way to tell the story of Montana’s ranching families that raise the beef that consumers all across the world enjoy. There seems to be a growing disconnect as people, even here in Montana, are losing touch with what goes on at ranches and farms, and where our food comes from.”

Big Sky Boots is part of a larger project that uses social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube to tell the stories of Montana’s ranching families through photo albums, audio slide shows, and videos.

Chase says that one hallmark of the book is that the photos are largely untouched or enhanced by photo editing software.

Chase noted, “A lot of books that are out there right now depict a romanticized view of the West and of the cowboy lifestyle. We wanted to make sure to show life as it really is on Montana’s ranches. I think there is a tremendous amount of natural beauty in the pictures and it gives the reader a glimpse into the life of a real cowboy in Montana.”

Big Sky Boots is the first book in a series of five books that MSGA will develop over the next five years. The next book, already in production, will feature the women that are an essential part of today’s ranching families.

Click here to learn more about the project.

Farewell and Thank You – Big Sky Boots [Giveaway]

 

Originally posted on Agricultureproud.com on Nov. 6, 2012. 

I have to go out on a high note right? I really can’t wrap up my blogging without saying THANK YOU to all of my friends and followers! And I have the PERFECT gift for one lucky person!

Thanks to the generosity and creativity of my friend Lauren Chase at the Montana StockGrowers Association (MSGA), I have a great work of art to share. Big Sky Boots: Working Seasons of a Montana Cowboy is the first in a series of Photo books that highlights the work, passion, and lives of the Montana Cattlemen, women, and their ranching families. This book is seriously a piece to treasure.

Chase (@LaurenMSea) has traveled numerous miles and spent hours working alongside Montana ranchers to take us “on a journey through a year in the life of Montana’s cowboys—through calving, branding, and shipping, and everything in between.” She is a perfect example of how someone can grow up and not have a background in agriculture, but develop a strong love and passion for this way of life. A great example for many.

The book contains very high-quality photos of the Montana scenery, the story of the rancher’s work through the seasons, and links to online content for more behind the story. She really does a great job of sharing the Agriculture story with those who want to learn more about where their food comes from.

I have a copy that will go to one lucky winner. Anyone can enter, but if the winner is on a farm or ranch, I ask that you eventually pass it along to someone who wants to learn more about American Agriculture (as that is one purpose of the MSGA project).

How do you enter to win?

You can win a copy of Big Sky Boots ($75.00 value)! Fill out the form below and respond to the question from a consumer’s perspective – “How can you learn more about American Agriculture?”

Put some thought into it. In what ways can you reach out to farmers, ranchers, and those involved in our food production system to learn more about where our food comes from? How can you reach out, ask questions, and work with others to make improvements in a productive manner?

I’ll pick a winner using a random number generator from the responses to the contact form below. The winner will be contacted on Thursday, November 15th and responses will be shared on this blog.

If you just can’t wait, visit the MSGA web site to order your copy. It will make a great Christmas gift for someone!

 

Big Sky Boots for Christmas

Do you have an uncle in Chicago? A cousin in Los Angeles? Big Sky Boots is the perfect Christmas present for them! This photographic journey through a Montana ranch year teaches audiences of all backgrounds about what happens on a ranch and how beef ends up on consumers’ plates.

Ordering is easy! Visit: www.mtbeef.org and click the “Shop” tab or stop by the MSGA booth at our convention in December to pick up your copy!

Dayton ranch family featured in stockgrowers’ book

Posted: Saturday, October 20, 2012 10:00 pm | Updated: 8:53 pm, Sat Oct 20, 2012.

By LYNNETTE HINTZE/The Daily Inter Lake |

The Meuli family’s ranching roots reach down five generations in Proctor Valley, so when it came time for the Montana Stockgrowers Association to profile Montana cowboys in its new book, the Meulis were well-suited to the theme.

“We’re kind of the last longtime ranch” in the Dayton-Proctor area, Mike Meuli said.

His great-grandfather came to Proctor Valley in 1900, homesteading not far from the present Meuli ranch his grandfather bought in the 1920s.

“This is where my dad grew up,” Meuli said. “This is were I grew up.”

And it’s where Meuli and his wife Nancy’s three children are growing up.

The Stockgrowers Association featured working ranches across Montana in the just-released coffee-table book, “Big Sky Boots: Working Seasons of a Montana Cowboy.”

The book features the photography of Lauren Chase, the association’s multimedia outreach specialist. She spent 18 months traveling to ranches all over the Big Sky State. Her work takes the reader on a journey through a year in the life of Montana’s cowboys, from calving and branding to rounding up and shipping out cattle.

“There seems to be a growing disconnect as people, even here in Montana, are losing touch with what goes on agriculturally on ranches and farms, and where our food comes from,” Meuli said. “This book is meant to help ranch families like ours tell our story, so I am very excited to be involved.”

“Big Sky Boots” is part of a larger project to bring beef eaters closer to the people who raise and care for cattle, according to a Montana Stockgrowers Association press release. The project uses social media such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to tell the stories of Montana’s ranching families through photo albums, audio slide shows and videos.

The book connects the social media platforms to the printed page.

“Something really unique to our book is that we have included QR codes that people can scan with their smartphones,” Chase said. “They can go to MSGA’s YouTube channel to watch a video of the rancher featured in the book and hear directly from him about his life. In that way we’ve really tried to marry the traditional print media with the social media that seems to be central in so many people’s lives today.”

Meuli owns 1,750 acres and leases another 15,000 acres to accommodate a herd of 470 Angus cows.

The book’s photography features Meuli and his two sons, John Michael, 19, now a freshman at Montana State University, and Matthew, 16. Matthew’s twin sister, Mikayla, likewise is an integral part of the ranch family.

A former part-time ranch hand, Garrison Vrooman, also appears in a few photographs that were taken in the summer of 2011.

“We fill in with part-time labor,” Meuli said. “We’ve never had a full-time hired man, though I could easily keep another full-time person busy.”

The Meulis raise their own hay, and the work is never ending as the seasons unfold at the ranch. Calving runs from February to April; then the cattle are put out to pasture in May and June and herded to forest land for grazing in July through September. The first week in October, the annual roundup began, bringing in the herd for the winter.

Horses still are used for much of the cattle herding, especially in the rougher terrain. But all-terrain vehicles, namely four-wheelers, are quicker in some situations.

“The basics of ranching haven’t changed,” Meuli said.

Haying, calving, branding and herding are age-old activities that remain a big part of ranching.

What has changed is, of course, the use of technology. Electronic identification tags make it possible to keep track of source and age verification and other data that follow a cow until it’s finished and processed into meat. Most of the Meulis’ cattle are weaned at 600 pounds and shipped to feedlots in Nebraska and Iowa for finishing, but the electronic tracking allows a consumer buying a package of steak from Meuli cattle to electronically call up information about the Meuli ranch.

Ultrasound technology is used when selecting which bulls to buy, and also for cows to determine the size of the ribeye, the amount of marbling and backfat.

And there’s a lot more environmental management these days, Meuli said. On the land he leases from Plum Creek Timber Co., he does riparian monitoring twice a year and fences areas to exclude the cattle from getting too close to certain creeks.

“Most ranchers with cattle and land want to do a good job and to be sustainable you have to do a good job,” he said.

“Big Sky Boots” is the first book in a series of five books the stockgrowers association will develop over the next five years. The next book, already in production, will feature the women who are an essential part of today’s ranching families.

To learn more about the project or to order a copy of the book, visit www.mtbeef.org. The books are $75, which includes shipping and handling. The profits from the book will help support the continuation of the association’s “Telling the Story of Montana’s Family Ranchers” project into the future.

Features editor Lynnette Hintze may be reached at 758-4421 or by email at lhintze@dailyinterlake.com.